If you want to
get serious in thinking about this problem, as opposed to just writing
about it, you have to pay attention to the larger context in which
writing education occurs in this country. That context is in large
classrooms of 30 or more students with overworked and underpaid
instructors who have to grade stacks of 100 or more papers at a time.
These are people who are on their feet teaching 5-6 hours a day, usually
with administrative responsibilities that keep them before and after
school. When do they grade all of those papers? In my experience, the
answer is: on the weekend, and at night, when they should be spending
time with their families.
All
you have to do is isolate one aspect of the writing process – say,
revisions – and you see right away why these numbers don’t work. If the
revision process is to be effective, feedback on student papers has to
be thorough and timely. If you can’t return extensive comments on a
paper in one week, the revision process is unlikely to work properly. I
don’t know that I’ve ever met a teacher who thought that was even
remotely possible.  
 
I am about to walk into the first day of my
first year composition course at essay writing service  school, and I’m sure I will
discover that most of my students are not good writers. I don’t blame
them for that, and I don’t blame their teachers. They are both victims
of the neglect of a larger system.